Tuesday, July 19, 2011

miss independent

Even when you're not going all out with buttercream, fondant, gumpaste, modelling chocolate, ganache, drages, edible transfers, sugar art (are you tired yet?), you can still be very creative with the cake itself. Whether it's playing with the flavors or the appearance, it's just as satisfying (and less exhausting) to tweak a simple layer cake.

In architecture, my favorite type of drawing is the section, which is where you "cut" through a building to show the construction of the exterior and also what space looks like on the interior. So you can imagine the possibilities are endless when it comes to the section cut of a cake. Look at these amazing sections:
 
(ok, not cake)

(via Omnomicon)



(via Whisk Kid)

So to accompany the Fourth of July is the American-flag-section cake. Seen on many blogs and in several variations, the step by step process involves baking several red, white, and blue round cakes (by coloring the cake batter), then alternating and fitting them into one another so that when cut, each slice resembles our grand ol' flag.

I loved the idea but didn't want to incorporate the blue cake so I saved that for the frosting on top. I also decided to only use red velvet cake with thick white frosting stripes in between, so I baked several 8" round cakes (2" deep pans), cut the rounded tops off, and split each cake in half (about 0.5-1" thick each).



Started building up with layer of cake, thick layer of frosting, cake, frosting.


Ideally I was going to have 7 layers of cake and 6 layers of frosting in order to fully represent our original 13 colonies, but I cut it short for sake of time and it was already plenty of cake. Also decided to leave the sides plain because it was already going to be several 1/2" layers of frosting inside, and it has a more rustic appearance (though I love the simple look of this one, which completely masks the patriotic interior to unsuspecting guests)


Topped with blue frosting and gumpaste stars.


Happy birthday America!

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